John Henry Newman – Part 2

The following per JHN perspective will be defined below:

Calvinism – was the first doctrinal system JHN read. It was delivered to him by an unnamed gentleman. [page 15]. JHN rejected Calvinism at

Arians – The principal heresy which denied the full Divinity of Jesus Christ, so called after its author, Arius.

F. L. Cross and Elizabeth A. Livingstone, eds., The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (Oxford;  New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), 100.

Nicene Creed – From the Council of Nicea 325 AD.

Primitive Church – was the Church in the first Centuries after the resurrection of Christ. Prior to and during the time of the General Councils. [Nicea]

Monophysites and Eutychians

The doctrine that in the Incarnate Christ there is only one nature, not two. Monophysitism which represents a strict form of *Alexandrian Christology, covers a variety of positions, some capable of orthodox interpretation, others not. The term ‘Monophysite’ was first used in the aftermath of the Council of *Chalcedon (451) to describe all those who rejected the Council’s Definition that the Incarnate Christ is one Person ‘in two Natures’, and upheld, as their key formula the phrase of St *Cyril of Alexandria, ‘one Incarnate Nature of the Word’. It is still sometimes used to refer to the *Oriental Orthodox Churches.

F. L. Cross and Elizabeth A. Livingstone, eds., The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (Oxford;  New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), 1111.

Eutyches affirmed that there was only one ‘nature’ (φύσις) in Christ ‘after the union’, and denied that His manhood was consubstantial with ours, a view which was held to be incompatible with our redemption through Him. Although the *Oriental Orthodox Churches share his language of ‘one nature after the union’, they explicitly condemned him for his denial that Christ’s human nature was consubstantial with ours. See also monophysitism.

F. L. Cross and Elizabeth A. Livingstone, eds., The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (Oxford;  New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), 581.

Liberals – the doctrine that there is no doctrine or dogma.

Erastianism – the view that the State should rule over the church in ecclesiastical matters.

Evangelicals – remained in the Church of England but were not High Churchmen.

In the C of E the term is currently applied to the school which lays special stress on conversion and salvation by faith in the atoning death of Christ. The group originated in the 18th cent. to bring reality into religion when a low tone pervaded English life and many clergy were negligent and worldly. The centre of Evangelicalism is the home and family, and from Evangelical families came many Christian leaders, not all of whom remained Evangelical. Early rising and family prayers have been at the heart of Evangelical piety.

F. L. Cross and Elizabeth A. Livingstone, eds., The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (Oxford;  New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), 583.

Tracts for the Times – a series of tracts written on behalf of the Oxford Movement by various authors written to disseminate Church principles ‘against Popery and Dissent’

F. L. Cross and Elizabeth A. Livingstone, eds., The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (Oxford;  New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), 1645.

Supremacy – the idea that King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth left the Roman Church due to not wanting to be servient to the Pope.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s